by Michael dEstries
Categories: Internet.

cartoons.jpgMove over Thundercats and Duck Tales, there are some new, cool, green cartoons in town! Okay, perhaps it’s been a few years since I sat down and watched some quality TV cartoons, but I’m getting excited over the new educational/fun animated shows hitting both television and online.

First up, we have The Unsustainables! Not only does it feature a eco-talking goat that sounds like the bee from those Claritin commercials, but the animation and stories are top-notch and funny. It’s currently available on Comcast’s first green channel, Green Scene, but only in the San Francisco Bay Area. Bummer. Still, chances are this series will go national. (Sundance, pick these shorts up for THE GREEN!) Till then, you can catch all the action online at Sustainlane.com

New to the world, and recently announced at TED, comes a new online series called The Greens. As Victoria highlights on her site,

“This broadband project comes from WGBH in Boston, the producer of TV shows like ZOOM, ARTHUR, & FETCH as well as Frontline, Antiques Roadshow & NOVA. But THE GREENS is not on TV. Kids can watch THE GREENS’ comedy cartoon adventures online and then find related games, news, downloads, a blog, action tips, links, and much more.”

The nice thing about these cartoons (and a trend becoming more common) are the little snippets of humor thrown in for adults that generally zip over a kid’s head. Both of these series have a quality that anyone of any age will appreciate and enjoy watching. Ahhh…reminds me of the good old days with Captain Planet. (grin) Hit the sites for more information. For your viewing pleasure, I present one of the Unsustainable cartoons below:

About Michael dEstries

Michael has been blogging since 2005 on issues such as sustainability, renewable energy, philanthropy, and healthy living. He regularly contributes to a slew of publications, as well as consulting with companies looking to make an impact using the web and social media. He lives in Ithaca, NY with his family on an apple farm.

View all posts by Michael dEstries →