by Michael dEstries
Categories: Fashion.

smug twatAs we reported earlier, people are dishin’ negative reviews on the latest “eco-bag” craze with good intentions apparently overshadowed by the umbrella of “I’m Not A Plastic Bag”. While not created to stand as a symbol of everything green and holy, the Anna Handmarch tote has unfortunately fell victim to social consumerism and is now demanding poor souls to wait in line for hours. So, what to do? Well, how about make fun of the entire craze?

That’s exactly what one enterprising UK designer decided to do with her new “I’m Not A Smug Twat” take on the fashion phenomenon. From the article,

“‘I came up with the idea when I saw reports of people queuing at Sainsbury’s. I don’t understand why anyone would want to queue for hours just to get their hands on a bag. It seems crazy,’ said designer Marissa Vandersee.”

Her new bag is also more “local” than the original — making them herself and then selling them at London’s Brick Lane and Broadway market.

“‘They’re supposed to be ethical and yet it turns out they’re exploiting people. My bag might be a bit more expensive but the only cheap labour I’m exploiting is me.’ She added: ‘I also support local sourcing and production. My fabrics are sourced in Northern Ireland, England and Italy, while they are produced in London and Wales.’”

These are hilarious — though British humor is always more edgy than anything Americans could get away with on their bags. We’ll probably see some bland version that says something like, “I’m Not A Consumer” or something equally horrible. “Smug Twat” just hits it home like no other expression.

Hit Marissa’s site for more — and to order your own bag!

via Hippyshopper

About Michael dEstries

Michael has been blogging since 2005 on issues such as sustainability, renewable energy, philanthropy, and healthy living. He regularly contributes to a slew of publications, as well as consulting with companies looking to make an impact using the web and social media. He lives in Ithaca, NY with his family on an apple farm.

View all posts by Michael dEstries →
  • http://www.ecorazzi.com rebecca

    HAHAHAHA….you’re right, we’d never come up with a cool saying like that.

  • http://www.mables.com/blog Alison

    Lol, these are great! if only they were sold in USD$ :\

  • Pingback: ~ I'm not a plastic bag either... reprise ~ « ~ Urbania to Stoneheads ~

  • http://selahwrites.blogspot.com/ Selah

    My take on the original bag was that it is a lot easier to criticize than to find the good news in the product. Since when is being a little green so bad? The original bags made a statement about reusing, and avoiding plastic bags. Nowhere was it claimed they were organic, or produced locally. In fact, they offset the carbon, and used SA 8000 compliant factories to produce them. It is nigh on to impossible to make everybody happy, and the I’m Not A Plastic Bag is fine by me. If you want to look at a corporation that borders on slave labor, look no further than WalMart. Talk about hypocrisy!

  • http://www.askchopper.com Chopper

    Hilarious!

    Can she make one that says “Made by small Children thousands of miles away” too? :)

    I hate it when companies try to show they’re doing the right yet at the same time do something else that’s completely wrong (intentionally)!

  • Kat

    It doesn’t really matter where it’s made, or what it’s made out of… The point is, people who like this bag will want to use it and that in itself can reduce the consumption of plastic bags.
    The goal wasn’t to diminish child labor or cheap labor in China.

    If people like this bag and decide to use it as an alternative to plastic shopping bags, then the message and goal is effective.

    People who want this bag know its intended purpose and ultimately it’s a personal choice to stop using plastic or not. The bag itself doesn’t make a difference, it’s the attitude people adopt.

    The message is boldly imprinted on the bag so it’s promoting awareness and a 2nd look at things.
    Like if you bring it to a supermarket where everyone is packing their stuff in plastic, they might think twice next time

  • Lily

    There is a backlash against this bag for a reason…and all you had to do was be at Fred Segal in Santa Monica the day the bags went on sale. The majority of the mob of VULTURES outside the store were not there because they cared about the enviroment or the message of the bag- they were there because A. they say celebrities wearing the bag in the media B. they wanted to turn around and sell the bag on e-bay for $200 or C. they are insipid fashion victims. Aside from that when the bags sold out people where shouting and swearing at the Fred Segal staff. PLEASE! No one in their right mind would stand in line for five hours for a shopping bag and be rude and abusive when if you are really that passionate about not using plastic you could just as easily go buy a canvas bag at the grocery store. After seeing this hoard I would be embarrassed to wear that bag by association.

  • http://www.bagsofchange.co.uk Violet

    Fancy starting your own green anti-plastic bag trend? Have a look at the Bags of Change shopping bag. It’s beautifully designed and made from organic hemp-cotton: http://www.bagsofchange.co.uk

  • Sarah

    I think your version is a little too expensive to be honest…I hear where you’re coming from but I’m in NY and I’m not going to pay $60 for your bag…

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  • julia

    fyi-
    It’s Anya Hindmarch not Anna Handmarch