by Michael dEstries
Categories: Eats.

rachel.jpgWhile we were pleading with Rachel Ray to introduce composting in the kitchen, she decided to turn her attention to addressing an even more intensive resource hog: her magazine.

Called Everyday With Rachel Ray, the subscription numbers have turned into $49 million worth of ad revenue for the first seven issues (versus $8 million over four in 2006). It’s a hot spin-off of the Rachel Ray empire — and this month she’s doing something that even Oprah (gasp!) can’t deliver: the magazine is being printed on 85% recycled paper. From the article,

“’Starting this month, we’re printing our magazine on recycled paper and saving 11,500 trees with every issue—that’s 115,000 trees a year!’ Ray wrote in the November issue’s editor’s note. ‘November is our greenest issue ever.’”

The chlorine-free recycled paper is 10 percent post-consumer waste and 85 percent post-printing waste, according to the magazine.

To reduce emissions, the magazine also switched paper mills reducing the distance between the new mill—near Chicago—and the printer by almost 900 miles. Impressive.

Now, about that garbage bowl thing….

About Michael dEstries

Michael has been blogging since 2005 on issues such as sustainability, renewable energy, philanthropy, and healthy living. He regularly contributes to a slew of publications, as well as consulting with companies looking to make an impact using the web and social media. He lives in Ithaca, NY with his family on an apple farm.

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  • http://bestgreenblogs.com/meta Timothy Latz

    Finally! This is good news and perhaps will set an example for the rest of the magazine publishing world.
    I get so ticked to see a variety of magazines publish their yearly “Green Issue” on regular glossy paper stock. Hopefully more publishers will pick up on this positive green trend..