by Michael dEstries
Categories: People
Tags: .

Before Brad Pitt launched his Make It Right foundation to build 150 new sustainable homes in New Orleans’ devastated Lower 9th Ward, he lent his name and cash to assisting Global Green USA with a similar initiative.

Though on a much smaller scale compared to the “Pink Houses” neighborhood, Global Green’s Holy Cross campaign is nonetheless impressive. Five single-family homes as well as an 18 unit apartment complex all built green and saving an estimated $1200 to $2400 a year in utility bills.

“The style is a modern spin on the traditional shotgun-style architecture New Orleans is known for, with an open floor plan and clear view from the front door through the home and out the back door to allow for good air flow and ventilation. ‘It’s all about creating light and capturing that breeze,’ Global Green’s Beth Galante said. The home is long and narrow like a shotgun, but instead of a traditional pitched roof, the roofline slopes from one side of the home to the other. That allows for the solar panels on the roof to get the maximum amount of sun exposure. The solar panels will provide for more than half the home’s energy needs, Galante said.

Costs to build the Global Green homes will range from $150,000 to $175,000, Petersen said, but the cost to homeowners — through subsidies — will be about $120,000-$150,000.”

While Pitt has not visited the house since its completion, Global Green’s CEO Matt Petersen expects it will only be a matter of time. “He contributed significantly to this home being built,” Petersen said. “We’re deeply grateful for all that he has done.”

Click more to view more photos of the home.

About Michael dEstries

Michael has been blogging since 2005 on issues such as sustainability, renewable energy, philanthropy, and healthy living. He regularly contributes to a slew of publications, as well as consulting with companies looking to make an impact using the web and social media. He lives in Ithaca, NY with his family on an apple farm.

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