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Celebrity Chef Confuses Salad Topping With Poisonous Plant

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In every job there are certain mistakes you just CAN’T make.  When it comes to being a famous chef that mistake would be TELLING YOUR READERS TO EAT POISON!!! I’m vegan, right? I mean I eat a lot of frigin greens, so I’m not trying to start some sort of wide-spread salad panic, but just be careful where you get your info from.

Celebrity British chef, Antony Worrall is apologizing today after telling Healthy & Organic Magazine readers that henbane is “great in salads.”  In case you’re not aware, henbane is often known as stinking nightshade, because of its pungent odour. Its name, derived from Anglo-Saxon, means “killer of hens”, and consumption can cause hallucinations, convulsions, vomiting and death.

Healthy & Organic Living, which has a circulation of 40,000, says it is “the only magazine dedicated to providing information and advice for modern women who want to discover how to lead a healthy and organic lifestyle”. Yeah, if modern equals gullible and healthy and organic mean non-existent!!

To it’s credit, the magazine sent letters to subscribers warning that, “henbane is a very toxic plant and should never be eaten”, and apologizing for the confusion. So to review — romaine, spinach, collards = good, henbane = bad…VERY BAD! 

via: timesonline.co

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