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"Wolverine" Sequel Gets A Green Light

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Even though Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine flick was widely panned by critics (and X-Men fans alike), it still managed to pull in a respectable $363 million worldwide. We also dug the film because it was a heavy hitter in terms of green production value. Producers managed to divert 92% of the 670 tonnes created during filming from landfills; saving almost $55,000 in the process. Jackman also lauded the effort saying he was “proud to be a part of the new generation of sustainable filmmakers.”

Not surprisingly, the sequel to the movie — once more to be produced by Jackman — was announced as in production by the man himself at the Teen Choice Awards on Sunday. Supposedly, the plot takes place in Japan — which is potentially good news for yet another sustainable production. The reason I’m hopeful is because it’s not uncommon for studios to film in New Zealand and use the country’s backdrop to mimic Japan’s. It was done with Tom Cruise’s The Samuri and I’m sure it would make financial sense in this case. Additionally, it’s New Zealand that’s pushing these green screen initiatives (where much of Wolverine was shot) — so the same rules would once again be in effect. I’m speculating here, but it’s possible that the Wolverine sequel could carry an even lighter footprint thanks to methods learned on the previous production.

Then again, perhaps the only real question on everyone’s minds is if Bryan Singer will be back to direct this latest X-Men chapter.

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