by Michael dEstries
Categories: Eats, Fashion
Tags: .
Photo: PR Photos

stilesIn a new interview with EcoStilleto.com, actress Julia Stiles opens up on her mock green fashion video, her love of the “human” side of environmentalism, and why she now regrets dissing her former vegan lifestyle. Check out a preview of the interview below!

That “Julia Stiles Styles” video is hilarious. Tell me how that came about.

We did “Oleanna” first in L.A. before we took it to New York and I met the guys who are in The Vacationeers; they were friends of friends. I thought their movie “The Scenesters” was really good and their videos for Google were really funny. We were hanging out one day, throwing around ideas and I just thought the idea of Julia Stiles Styles was great.

I didn’t mean to be disparaging of green fashion—also, we weren’t making fun of any celebs who promote that kind of thing. We were making fun of me. The idea that can create unwearable clothing. And of celebs who can be out of touch with how rich they are. So [in the video] the clothing is really expensive but it was inspired by homeless people.

Do you wear eco-friendly fashion?

There’s a raw food lunch spot here in New York called One Lucky Duck and I follow her blog a lot; she has links to other eco-clothing places. But I appreciate more the clothing lines that have equitable working standards for the people who make their clothing. I wish I could find more of them.

I really like the Edun label that Bono started. Other than that I feel kind of ignorant about the rest of it. I like the idea, I just don’t know how to find that many. I do have a few Edun t-shirts though.

What about eco-beauty?

I like all-natural products. Burt’s Bees is great, I like Dr. Bronner’s. Dermal-K is a company that’s all natural. All of the stuff that you can find a the health food store. No chemicals.

I’ve read about your work with Habitat for Humanity International and it seems that the concept of social responsibility is very important to you—more so than eco-consciousness. Is that true?

Obviously it’s important for consumers to be conscious about how we’re affecting the environment. But I think I’m more concerned with the human aspect of it. I would love to find a clothing line where the pieces are manufactured in a fair way. A label—like the fair trade certification label that you see on food—just so you know that the clothing isn’t made in a horrible sweatshop. Even American Apparel, they say everything is manufactured in L.A. but that doesn’t mean that the conditions under which they’re working are fair and friendly.

I feel like a hypocrite because my video is making fun of all this but it actually is important. Even Edun, which uses organic cotton as the main material in their clothing line, that’s important too because somebody that is growing that cotton has to inhale those chemicals.

How important do you think these kinds of actions are for you, personally?

I like that on your website there are simple tips of everyday things that you can do to be more conscious about now harming the environment. Obviously big changes need to happen but on an individual level it adds up. It’s not just one plastic water bottle you’re using. You have to multiply that by millions of people.

Are you still a vegan?

I’m not. I was for a couple of years and I ended up getting anemic. I regret going on a talk show and talking about it—I was young and impressionable and trying to be funny and I said something about how when I stopped it was great. But it wasn’t good, health wise, for me. I wasn’t doing it right, I think. I’ve incorporated the reason that I became a vegan in the first place into my diet now. I don’t eat meat that doesn’t come from a good source. I like to know what the animal was eating before I eat it.
For more of Julia’s exclusive interview with EcoStiletto, visit here.

About Michael dEstries

Michael has been blogging since 2005 on issues such as sustainability, renewable energy, philanthropy, and healthy living. He regularly contributes to a slew of publications, as well as consulting with companies looking to make an impact using the web and social media. He lives in Ithaca, NY with his family on an apple farm.

View all posts by Michael dEstries →
  • http://www.plantpeacedaily.org JC

    Check out this informative and inspiring video on why people choose vegan: veganvideo.org/

    Also see Gary Yourofsky: youtube.com/watch?v=bagt5L9wXGo

    • http://vegan--japan.blogspot.com/ herwin

      she eats meat that comes from a good source…

      • http://vegan--japan.blogspot.com/ herwin

        oh, the previous comment wasnt meant to be a reply to JC..

  • Irwin

    This girl is dumb as a rock. Has she ever been to the American Apparel factory? They give tours to people if they want it. They provide their workers with affordable health insurance, discounted lunch, a medical clinic, and pay well above the minimum wage.

    • Steve

      I wouldn’t argue that that is common knowledge. Then again, I’m not American. Besides, she’s of Ivy League pedigree. Surely that says something? =)

  • VeggieTart

    Oh, she’s fallen for the “humane meat” greenwashing bullshit.

    • Meat Lover

      Meat is good.
      Humans are meant to eat meat.

      • Book Reader

        Humans are meant to eat meat?

        How MUCH meat?

        Is that why we have evolved such great claws for killing, large sharp teeth for piercing and tearing, and large jaws for biting into carcasses?

        Oh wait, no, we actually have fingers instead of claws, grinding teeth rather than sharp ones (great for fruits, veggies, & grains!), and small mouths (certainly not large enough to put any significant dent into a cow). Oh well.

        If humans are at all “meant” to eat meat, we’re certainly BUILT to eat more plant-based foods.

  • http://ipandaud.blogspot.com erincathleen

    This is a shame. At least she admits to not going vegan the right way; I was vegetarian on-and-off for years and every time I stopped I claimed it wasn’t working or that I “wasn’t doing it right.” So you know what? I finally saw a nutritionist, and now it’s great. :) She’s rich enough to afford one of those herself. Then maybe she really could be a voice for a vital cause.

  • MelleRose

    Yeah… her whole video of high priced fashion inspired by the what the homeless wear… wasn’t that the final scene in that Zoolander movie with Ben Stiller?

    She does seem rather out of touch in deed.