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Moby Questions Author Mark Bittman About Veganism And Factory Farming

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Earlier this week, Food Matters author Mark Bittman participated in a live chat on CBC Books. Bittman is the author of six books and has a weekly column in the New York Times.

Since food is Bittman’s speciality, Moby took a moment during the chat to ask the author what he thinks about veganism and factory farming. Mark had this to say:

“I think veganism is the most principled position one can take when it comes to eating; there is no need to eat animal products at all, and – aside from processed food – they are the most damaging foods produced, both from a personal and a global perspective.

“Having said that, I think veganism is a very tough sell. And I would rather see millions, tens of millions of people significantly reduce their consumption of animal products than see tens of thousands eliminate them.

“As an aside, let’s also remember that one can be a vegan and still eat junk. So my advice remains – eat plants above all else, eat unprocessed or minimally processed plants whenever possible, and eat these foods at the expense of everything else, particularly animal products and junk.”

Sounds like a plan to us! Not ready to take the VEG plunge completely? Why not start with Mark’s “vegan until six” approach? To check out the entire live chat, visit CBC.CA!

via: vegetarianstar.com

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