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Musicians Gather To Stop Appalachian Mountain Top Removal

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On May 19 at Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, a star-studded lineup featuring Emmylou Harris, Dave Matthews, Patty Loveless, and Kathy Mattea will take the stage to support Nature Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in its efforts to stop Appalachian mountain top removal.

The Music Saves Mountains concert will see the largest gathering ever of music stars to raise awareness of mountaintop removal coal mining. Proceeds for the event will be used in efforts to pass legislation that ends the catastrophic practice that is destroying Appalachia.

Singer-songwriter Tift Merritt recently joined the lineup which also includes Sheryl Crow and Big Kenny of Big & Rich. The Grammy-winning songbird said, “Mountaintop removal is heartbreaking, harrowing and unnecessary. What is happening to the Appalachian Mountains and the citizens there should make activists of us all.”

Tickets for the Music Saves Mountains concert, priced $45-$300, go on sale March 5 and will be available at the Ryman box office and online at musicsavesmountains.org and ryman.com.

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