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Artist/Activist Paints Buenos Aires' Riachuelo Green To Celebrate World Water Day

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There’s green and then there’s GREEN! Yesterday on World Water Day, Argentine artist Nicolas Garcia Uriburu teamed up with Greenpeace Argentina to exercise the latter. The artist got his activist on by painting the Buenos Aires’ Riachuelo — one of the most polluted rivers in the world — green.

Now wait, before you get all like, “He put PAINT IN THE EFFING RIVER,” take a second to relax. The paint Uriburu used was totally harmless for the water, and, according to Greenpeace is a “yellow water-soluble liquid that produces a green fluorescent color when in touch with alkaline solutions. It’s used in ophthalmology to examine the eye’s blood vessels, to check for alterations in the corneal epithelium and in the tear duct, and to prove the permeability of tear ducts, among other studies.”

Uriburu has been staging exhibits like this for years to help draw attention to environmental problems, and during the action said, “I’ve been trying to alarm people against the contamination of rivers and oceans for 40 years, and it’s through my artistic performances that I’ve turned my work into a sort of alert. Today, with more motivations than 40 years ago, I still condemn water contamination and our savage destruction of the planet’s reserves. A planet that our blind omnipotence sees as endless and indestructible.”

What do you think about Nicolas Garcia Uriburu latest project? Green activism or a waste of time? Chime and share your thoughts!

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