by MPD
Categories: Animals
Tags: .
Photo: bravo.com

You broke my heart, Stephanie…you broke my heart!

Top Chef winner — and one of my all-time favorite contestants —  Stephanie Izard recently found herself in a big ol’ pot of hot water after hosting a veal dinner in a series of meals titled “Wandering Goat.”

Long story short: PETA was not happy with the chef’s choice and penned a letter saying, “We’re writing today because numerous individuals—including fans of yours—contacted us to let us know that they were shocked to see you promoting veal and even displaying a photo of a skinned baby calf—Guillermo, as you named him—on your Twitter.”

Izard, responding on her blog, explained her decision to use veal.

“In the past I have rarely used veal due to the inhumane treatment of calves,” said Stephanie. “However, I was contacted by a local farm that raises free range veal in a very respectable way. While many people shun veal, the greater culinary community will continue to have veal be a part of their menus. All I am trying to do is get people to look at these local farms as refuge from larger meat-processing plants.”

Free range veal? I’m not sure how that’s even possible!

Do you think Steph should just say no to the cruel meat or continue to support “local” veal? Leave a comment and speak your little heart out!

via: vegetarianstar.com

  • kristin

    whats the big deal? shes a chef that kills animals all the time. just another michael pollan groupie who wants to have her cow and eat it too. IT ISNT SURPRISING.

  • don miguelo

    Veal is made by confining the animal since birth and feeding it a liquid diet with minimal (or no) protein. That way no muscle is built up and thus, you have Veal.
    Can’t believe she bought that “free range” line hook, line and sinker!
    What are they on a free range in a cage standing in their own diarreah, rather than in a stockyard? Please…

  • mike

    are you two for real? first off kristin, we need more michael pollan groupies. do you honestly have any idea how dire our food systems are, and how badly they’re affecting our health? and dan, you should really give people who kind of know a whole lot more about this stuff than you the benefit of the doubt, don’t you think? just a little bit maybe?

    the veal came from kilgus farm, a family owned farm in fairbury, illinois. and guess what? those calves? they’re not in boxes!

    please… it isn’t suprising.

    • kristin

      no, mike, i don’t have any idea how dire our food systems are. it’s not like i spent the last 10 years researching, reading, protesting, organizing and wrote a whole book about it.

      the point of this is exactly what i said: awareness of the horrors of our food system should not result in a shift towards eating “humane” meat, it should result it a shift towards eating much much less or no meat (and dairy). i pick on michael pollan because he seems to think that somehow, we can all still eat meat, but do so humanely, and yet have enough food for the tremendous human population. it isn’t feasible.

      also, just because you don’t have a moral problem with the baby cows mentioned in the article, some of us still do – yes we are for real, and what do you expect, really? this site is run by a vegan.

    • don miguelo

      Mike, True, sort of. I was going by the 1980s, when the public saw true images of veal calves chained down and kept in crates to reduce muscle-building. More up to date info is here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veal

      I am not giving Stephanie, the American Veal Association, or the USDA the “benefit of the doubt” just because they are in the business. Why should people trust institutions proven to be corrupt and/or morally absent? That path leads to giving them all the control (info, perspective, history, and the subsequent future). I refuse to do that

      What a noble cause, to get awareness out about the better practices of a free-range veal industry. Riiiiigggghhht. That’s WAY UP there on the list of necessary causes. More likely she found a way to stand out in the chef’s industry and make some headlines. Relative to crate farming, it’s better, but that doesn’t mean it’s guilt-free!

      If you were pulled away from your mom within a few hours or days from birth, put on a field to eat, and then slaughtered within a few months, would that be an existence worth having? Is that what Nature intended?

      Maybe we should not try to re-ignite a food that doesn’t need to be, despite what “the greater culinary community” implies (whatever that is).

  • Bencat1000

    Free range veal?
    Let’s see…..the baby calves free range for how long before they are killed? How ridiculous! The fact is: humans are killing and eating babies. Free range is just a distraction from the obvious vicious crime that is happening to these newborn babies ripped away from their mothers.

    • http://www.bozzograo.net/littleworld Angela

      Bencat1000, April 24, 2010 at 10:54 am

      Free range veal?
      Let’s see…..the baby calves free range for how long before they are killed? How ridiculous! The fact is: humans are killing and eating babies. Free range is just a distraction from the obvious vicious crime that is happening to these newborn babies ripped away from their mothers.

      I absolutely agree with Bencat1000, there is no excuse, farmers are killing a baby that has been taken away from a mother cow who is also in distress.
      It is an extra income for a “dairy farmer”, and however well he can treat a calf, he allowed its birth only because he needed the cow to be pregnant to produce more milk.
      The whole industry is wrong.

  • http://www.bozzograo.net/littleworld Angela

    sorry, I copied the message twice…didn’t mean to

  • Karen

    I love veal. It’s delicious!