by Elizah Leigh
Categories: Animals, Causes, Eats
Tags: , .

Porn may have been her claim to fame, but these days Jenna Jameson focuses far more of her time on raising her two twin boys with mixed martial arts star Tito Ortiz, and despite a recent highly publicized domestic dispute between the two, it seems that they’ve regained a peaceful homelife for now.

The always busy mainstream pop culture blonde spends a great deal of time managing a multimedia empire including an online site and film production company called ClubJenna while continuing to model and host high profile entertainment events, but she’s not all about the greenbacks.

In fact, she actually has a soft spot for chickens.

The strict vegetarian and pleather-devotee has for the past several years offered up her much celebrated physique to PETA for numerous promos, including their highly publicized anti-McDonald’s McCruelty campaign which bemoans the fact that the global fast food purveyor still continues to use an antiquated, inhumane slaughter process called electric immobilization for the chickens rather than a more modern practice called controlled atmosphere killing (CAK).

Jameson’s latest PETA video fills the public in on how our largest chicken processor could make a relatively simple change to demonstrate basic compassion on behalf of the birds they slaughter by first rendering them unconscious – and yet for some reason McDonald’s chooses to cut their throats and scald them while they are still alive, which causes unnecessary suffering.

There is no ‘neat’ way of addressing the fact that untold numbers of animals are killed on behalf of our food industry, but if they are going to become a casualty anyway, PETA is suggesting that McDonald’s adopt the CAK method which offers a painless alternative (depriving chickens of oxygen during transport which results in death via anoxia) rather than subjecting them to the trauma of fully conscious slaughter.

Take a look at Jameson’s latest video below and share your thoughts on PETA’s latest campaign!


Via PETA