by Michael dEstries
Categories: Animals.

Two scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have pulled back the curtain on a little-known sea snail that generates its own light to ward off predators.

Looking like something straight out of James Cameron’s alien world of Pandora, these creatures are unique in that they use their shells to scatter and spread bright green bioluminescent light in all directions. “It’s rare for any bottom-dwelling snails to produce bioluminescence,” said on scientist. “So its even more amazing that this snail has a shell that maximizes the signal so efficiently.”

Next up, scientists hope to discovery how the snail disperses its light so efficiently and apply it to the optics industry. Check out the full article here.

About Michael dEstries

Michael has been blogging since 2005 on issues such as sustainability, renewable energy, philanthropy, and healthy living. He regularly contributes to a slew of publications, as well as consulting with companies looking to make an impact using the web and social media. He lives in Ithaca, NY with his family on an apple farm.

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  • Michael Raymer

    “a little-known sea snail that generates its own light to ward off predators.”

    How does light “ward off predators”. In every other case I’ve heard of, light attracts predators, to include the Anglerfish. Since when does light repel other sea life?

  • http://www.ecorazzi.com Michael dEstries

    “In experiments conducted inside Scripps’ Experimental Aquarium facility, Deheyn documented how H. brasiliana set off its glow, which he likens to a burglar alarm going off, when the snail was confronted by a threatening crab or a nearby swimming shrimp.”

    Perhaps it startles them?

    • Michael Raymer

      That’s interesting. I’ll have to look these little buggers up.