by Michael dEstries
Categories: Causes
Tags: .

For this year’s March 20th LA Marathon, organizers under the direction of owner Frank McCourt decided to place a lot more emphasis on the charitable component of the race. “The marathon is not only a great running event, it is a civic asset for all of Los Angeles, and an opportunity to do a lot of good for our community,” McCourt said.

Naturally, they turned to Edward Norton’s new fundraising site Crowdrise to help; especially in light of the orgs partnership with the New York Road Runners raising more than $30M for the NYC Marathon last year. The goal for LA is a reasonable $4M — and Edward Norton is excited for the opportunity to help make a difference.

“Crowdrise is all about giving people the right tools to raise money for their favorite cause in a new, fun and compelling way,” said Norton. “The Honda LA Marathon is an event that truly connects the entire city, and it has the potential to be an incredible fundraising force as well.  We are thrilled to be on board this year to help unite the entire LA Marathon running community.”

If successful, that $4M would more than double the charity raised from the race last year — the highest in its 25-year history.

“Crowdrise has proven itself as an exciting and engaging new fundraising platform, and we believe it will help bring added life to our fundraising effort,” said Ginger Williams, Director of Community Relations for the Marathon.  “Our partnership with Crowdrise will make it easier than ever for runners to raise money for whatever cause they support, and help them have a lot of fun in the process.”

Check out Norton’s personal video message to LA Marathon participants after the jump below!

About Michael dEstries

Michael has been blogging since 2005 on issues such as sustainability, renewable energy, philanthropy, and healthy living. He regularly contributes to a slew of publications, as well as consulting with companies looking to make an impact using the web and social media. He lives in Ithaca, NY with his family on an apple farm.

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