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Javier Bardem To Play 'Bond' Villian, Human Rights Hero in Real Life

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If you’ve seen ‘No Country for Old Men’ you have no confusion about Javier Bardem being cast as the new villain for the next James Bond film. The actor’s ability to channel evil is Oscar worthy. However, in his personal life, Bardem is 100% hero.

In an interview with Nightline, Bardem discussed his passion for helping the refugees in the Western Sahara. While once a Spanish colony, the area of Northern Africa is now a hotly disputed piece of land, and the people there are paying the price.

Bardem said, “I took a trip to the refugee camps and I saw it with my own eyes and I realized how much injustice are in those refugee camps. As a Spanish person, I would really need to do sometheing for these people.”

The interviewer asked him if it was national guilt that drives him to fight for the people of the Western Sahara. Afterall, Bardem is Spanish and the Western Sahara was a Spanish colony until a few decades ago. Bardem said, “National guilt is a good way to put it especially being the Christian country that we are.”

The academy award winner is making a documentary on the issue and has petitioned the UN to help the people. He plans on making his voice as loud and clear as possible to speak up for the refugees.

As for his new role in Bond, the actor is excited to be a part of a franchise he watched when he was a boy. While he couldn’t give away any of the details about his character, we’ll assume his haircut will be better in Bond than it was in his last big role as a villain.

Via OK!

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