ricobarry

Ric O’Barry, dolphin trainer turned dolphin activist, is known throughout the world for the award-winning documentary The Cove and his continuing presence for the dolphins in Taiji, Japan. Now, he will be honored for his work with the prestigious Bambi Award in Germany.

According to Save Japan Dolphins, the ceremony will be broadcast live to 5 million viewers as O’Barry is honored with the award, given to “people who have had an enduring effect on audiences and the public and have made the world a better place.” The activist will be honored for his work with Save Japan Dolphins and Earth Island Institute as well as The Cove, which won the 2010 Oscar for Best Documentary and has won more film festival awards than any other documentary.

Mark Palmer of Save Japan Dolphins says “While Mr. O’Barry is pleased to be receiving the award, more important is the chance to reach such a wide audience with his message: Don’t buy a ticket to a captive dolphin show or swim with captive dolphins! Dolphins should be free and left to live their lives in the wild.”

O’Barry is also in some very famous company. Previous Bambi Award winners include Bill Clinton, Queen Rania of Jordan, Kate WinsletMeg Ryan, Tom Cruise, Jennifer Lopez, Keanu ReevesBritney Spears, Orlando Bloom, and Sarah Jessica Parker.

About Jennifer Mishler

Jennifer Mishler is a writer, and a vegan and animal activist. When she's not writing, you can often find her volunteering or advocating for animal, environmental and human rights causes. Along with writing for Ecorazzi, she has contributed writing for nonprofits like Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, and enjoys blogging. She resides in the Washington, DC area (and loves all the vegan food it has to offer). Follow Jennifer on Twitter: @jennygonevegan.

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  • Kevin

    He should use this opportunity to help people understand Japanese culture. For example, as explained in pp 303-306 here: http://www.scribd.com/doc/30887965/Modern-Japanese-Culture

    It is interesting that the Japanese have such a different, animistic view. Also interesting that the consumption of livestock was banned for so long, leading to a different relationship to food from the sea. I sometimes wonder if this was in some ways a reaction to the need for land for crops, as livestock raising is so intensive and relatively unproductive. Japan is so mountainous that giving up cropland for livestock would have been unwise in an era of less plenty.

  • boo radley

    Jennifer Lopez???