palt
by Michael dEstries
Categories: Beauty, Eats, Lifestyle
Tags: .

Gwyneth Paltrow is kicking off the New Year with yet another cleanse – and this time, she’s hoping you’ll come along with her for the ride.

The 39-year-old is selling the unfortunately named “Goop Cleanse” for a whopping $425 on her website, promoting that the product will give “your digestive system a break and also improve energy levels by bringing in high-quality vitamins and nutrients.”

The marketing, which features attractive women doing attractive things in front of attractive fireplaces and Macbooks, says “Clean” focuses on “delivering serious results and inspiring long-term health changes.”

Health experts, however, are calling the whole thing bullshit. ”The best way to aide elimination of the ‘normal’ toxins you breathe in or eat (like food coloring in food), is to drink lots of water, eat vegetables, fruits and grains, which are full of fiber, and to get regular exercise,” NYC internist, Dr. Ronald Minultoli told HollywoodLife.com. “Cleanses are not necessary and there is nothing natural about doing one,” he added.

Now, I’m sure there are lots of us reading this that have done cleanses before – perhaps not the pretty-packaged version Paltrow is selling, but a juice cleanse or something other kind of flush.

I’m curious: What were your results? Did you find the cleanse effective? Would you try Paltrow’s for $425? Personally, I would recommend anyone looking to get healthy to simply take the advice of Dr. Minultoli and drink more water, eat more vegetables, etc. Save that cash!

About Michael dEstries

Michael has been blogging since 2005 on issues such as sustainability, renewable energy, philanthropy, and healthy living. He regularly contributes to a slew of publications, as well as consulting with companies looking to make an impact using the web and social media. He lives in Ithaca, NY with his family on an apple farm.

View all posts by Michael dEstries →
  • http://twitter.com/ArrowHead83 The Dave

    It’s true. All these “detox”, “colon cleanse”, etc. products are complete bullshit. At best – as is probably the case with Paltrow – they’re the result of an active imagination and the delusion of scientific understanding. I think more often they’re just plain scams.