NASA releases 'Perpetual Ocean' project to study Earth's ocean and sea surface currents
by Allyson Koerner
Categories: Causes, Environment, Video.
Photo: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

If you’ve been wondering what the ocean and sea surface currents look like over a two-year period, then you’re in luck.

NASA recently released its “Perpetual Ocean” project, where you can watch a visualization of the Earth’s water surfaces worldwide between the periods of June 2005 and December 2007.

Narration is not included in the time-lapse video, and according to NASA “the goal was to use ocean flow data to create a simple, visceral experience.”

When you watch the video, the Earth rotates and you can see white swirls move elegantly throughout the water and around the continents. Produced using the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II or ECCO2, the globe and water surfaces look like a work of art. ECCO2 usually provides ocean flows at all depths, but this version shows only the surface areas.

By using ECCO2 NASA can measure ocean currents, eddies and learn about the heat and carbon in our oceans. They hope this can help shed some light on how the ocean might be affected by climate change in the future. Overall, projects like the one below are just another learning tool for NASA.

Check it out…

About Allyson Koerner

Allyson Koerner first found her love of writing while attending Westminster College in Pennsylvania, and that passion evolved while she was earning her Master's in Print & Multimedia Journalism at Boston's Emerson College. She's an experienced writer dabbling in all things vegan, green, entertainment and TV-related. Feel free to keep tabs on her over at Twitter: @AllysonKoerner.

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