PUMA pledges to ban the use of fur and skins in its products.
by Kara DiCamillo
Categories: Animals, Causes, Fashion.
Photo: PUMA

Last year PUMA became the first major company in the world to put a value on its environmental impact to produce its clothing, shoes, and sportswear. The company and its parent group, PPR, published a report that showed the environmental impacts from the greenhouse gases and water consumption that was being used to produce its products. Since then, it has made a commitment to manufacture more sustainably and to develop more sustainable materials.

So it comes as no surprise that PUMA recently published a new policy on its PumaVision site declaring that they prohibit “using leathers, hides and/or skins from animals that have been treated inhumanely” and that they “will not use any animal fur in its products globally.”

Specifically, this policy includes:
- Furs, hides or skins from exotic animals like crocodiles, snakes, sharks or fishes
- Downs and feathers that are plucked from living geese or birds
- Merino wool from sources where mulesing practices are still applied

According to PETA, most of the world’s wool comes from Australia where ranchers perform “mulesling,” or mutilation, to keep the skin of sheep smoother and drier to avoid attacks from flies and maggots. Other companies such as H&M and Adidas have also pledged to stop using mulesed wool.

We’re thrilled that PUMA has taken this step and hope that more companies follow their good example.

About Kara DiCamillo

Kara began her writing career with TreeHugger.com in January 2005 and is also a contributing writer for TriplePundit, 1-800-RECYCLING.com, Sierra Club Green Home, EcoSalon and her local Newport Patch. Beyond the moat that surrounds her Newport, Rhode Island home, Kara has backpacked Mt. Washington in New Hampshire too many times to count, is a member of the Appalachian Mountain Club, a graduate of the Colorado Outward Bound School and, in real life, she is a public relations director.

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