Did you know that your version of Internet Explorer is out of date?
To get the best possible experience using our website we recommend downloading one of the browsers below.

Internet Explorer 10, Firefox, Chrome, or Safari.

Coca-Cola Blows Its Top Over Eco-Installation

Like us on Facebook:
The current article you are reading does not reflect the views of the current editors and contributors of the new Ecorazzi

Softdrink supergiant Coca-Cola has demanded that a recycling-themed installation known as The Cage, part of Sodastream’s advertising-cum-ecofriendly campaign, be taken down. Why? Some of the landfill-sourced bottles still retain legible Coke or Sprite labels.

The Cage, which actress Susan Sarandon originally unveiled in 2011, is a travelling exhibition that brings home the amount of beverage-related waste the average family creates: “5078 bottles & cans per family, every three years,” according to Sodastream. Since Coca-Cola says it sells 1.6 billion servings every day globally, well some of these bottles and cans are most likely from Coke’s parent company.

This installation is about advertising, but it’s also about art and reality: Coca-Cola shouldn’t be able to pretend that a trashed Coke bottle isn’t a trashed Coke bottle. Perhaps executives fear attention will be drawn away from their own environmental initiatives, which include a partnership with Recyclebank and the introduction of sugarcane bottles. Coke claims it plans to “recover half of the bottles and cans it sold annually and worldwide by 2015,” which is laudable, but bottleless is better than half.

What’s happening here is a battle over money and trademark fought using citizens who want the best for their planet and their bodies. Coca-Cola is responsible for the manufacturing and marketing of these bottles; we are responsible for purchasing and not recycling them. The solution may or may not be to use a Sodastream, but the problem is certainly a surplus of waste.

Like us on Facebook:
0 Comments

Protesting Kylie Jenner’s Use of Fur Doesn’t Help Animals

Campaigns against fur, whether that’s at the PETA level or a small mobbing like this, don’t work because they promote the use of other animal products.

Collaborating with animal exploiters won’t help animals

The two sides claim to both have the “health and well-being of animals” in mind in this partnership, but one likely said “after profitability” under their breath.

Exploitation for art is no worse than exploitation for dinner

It always seems to come back to a confused juror deciding when animal use is justified.