Brian May turns English property into wildlife refuge
by Allyson Koerner
Categories: Animals, Causes, Entertainment, Music
Tags: .

Brian May is known for being a king of rock ‘n’ roll as a guitarist with Queen, but he is now turning into the king of wildlife ever since he announced that his estate is now a refuge for several animals.

May’s English property was purchased by the musician more than 30 years ago and now the land is intended to act as a sanctuary for injured wildlife. As of right now, it houses 36 hedgehogs, seven badger cubs and two tawny owls.

May has always been an animal lover and takes pride in his refuge. “When I’m gone, people will no doubt remember me for Queen, but I would much rather be remembered for attempting to change the way we treat our fellow creatures,” he told The Sunday Times.

“Queen is a huge part of my life, but I do have other interests. People know about the astrophysics, but I love gardening too and I’ve always been passionate about the welfare of our wonderful British wildlife . . . I suppose I’ve lived a crazy life, and watching wildlife brings back a sense of tranquility,” he added.

This isn’t the first time May has taken a stand for animals. In January 2012, he joined forces with the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection’s fight against a proposed farm that would breed beagles for lab testing.

The rocker even started his own organization, called SAVE ME, to protect and save animals. In addition, for his animal-friendly work May received the International Fund for Animal Welfare award.

Photo Credit: Max Earey / Shutterstock.com

About Allyson Koerner

Allyson Koerner is a graduate from Emerson College where she obtained her Master’s in Print & Multimedia journalism. Passionate about writing, reading and entertainment, she is looking to make her way into the journalism profession.

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  • Deucleciano

    Brian is a true icon in more ways than one. Did anyone notice in his performance at the closing show of the Olympics 2012 Sunday night he was wearing an emblem of a fox on one sleeve and the emblem of a badger on the other, the latter soon to be unnecessarily slaughtered in England to appease livestock farmers.