Ian Somerhalder tweets support for United Nations-backed meeting regarding animal smuggling
by Allyson Koerner
Categories: Animals, Causes
Tags: .

Actor and animal activist Ian Somerhalder is probably one of the most influential voices on Twitter, and this time he’s using his huge platform to praise an upcoming discussion on animal issues at the the United Nation’s agenda meeting.

This week, issues such as, the smuggling of elephant ivory and rhino horn, tiger conservation and illegal trading of great apes are being talked about at the United Nations-backed meeting in Geneva.

Somerhalder tweeted, “YES! It should be! RT @actionforplanet: Elephant ivory and rhino horn on the agenda at United Nations-backed meeting.”

Around 350 participants are in attendance for the meeting of the Standing Committee of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which “oversees the implementation of rules for the international trade in protected wildlife on behalf of the Conference of the 175 member countries of CITES.”

The week-long meeting will continue to discuss the matter of poaching these unique creatures, in addition to the over-exploitation of freshwater turtles and tortoises, frogs and plants from Madagascar and Asian snakes used in the leather industry.

“With elephant and rhino poaching and smuggling levels being the worst in a decade, it is clear that strong additional measures are required,” said the Chairman of the Committee, Øysten Størkersen. “The present meeting will help set the priorities and to ensure the long-term survival of key species we would like to leave to future generations.”

Photo Credit: s_bukley / Shutterstock.com

About Allyson Koerner

Allyson Koerner is a graduate from Emerson College where she obtained her Master’s in Print & Multimedia journalism. Passionate about writing, reading and entertainment, she is looking to make her way into the journalism profession.

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  • Marbled Murrelet

    Industrial logging ought to be included in the plan to protect these species. I live in a county surrounded by Redwood Trees. These are NOT protected. They are being clearcut in huge numbers non-stop. The companies Humboldt Redwood Company, Sierra Pacific Industries, and Green Diamond/Simpson Lumber company are filing larger plans in order to cut quicker with less time & money to get pushed through the agencies. Simpson & HRC (GAP, Banana Republic) who recently bought out Pacific Lumber, Hurowitz’s MAXXAM, they have an “Incidental Take Permit” which means they can legally cut in places that were previously illegal to cut in due to Steep & Unstable Slopes, known Endangered Species’ nests & habitats, etc. I am not saying all logging is bad, there is an endless amount of Restoration that needs to happen & there are always trees that can be thinned, just the ruthless practice of ClearCutting has to stop! There is nothing “Sustainable” about Clearcutting, even though these companies sell to places like Home Depot as certified ‘sustainably harvested.’ Our home is becoming a moonscape, where even a few years ago they would go in, take a few trees, mill them locally, & return to the same spot years later. It is turning into Liquidation, & our area knows what that can look like. It looks like liquidation of the hillslopes above our towns & it turns to a mud slide like the one that took out the town of Stafford right below Julia Butterfly’s Redwood tree Luna. Let’s just look at cause & effect while we talk about endangered flora & fauna. There is a significant balance that comes to maintaining diversity & health of our ecosystems. A lot right now has to do with managing our corporations like Columbia Helicopters who are running amuck contracted to log internationally & locally in areas too steep to access without a military Chinook. Jobs are no longer local here, mills are shut down, fallers are from out of state, logs are shipped overseas, and we are left only with some serious cleanup that nobody is able to fund. I believe if local economies were allowed to thrive as small time businesses, utilizing lumber that is hastily thrown aside and burned as slash, much of it is Old Growth hardwoods that someone could make a lifelong living off of employing cabinet makers, etc. Instead they are cut down, burned, hack & squirt with Herbicides. Redwoods are planted where Douglas Firs had grown, Firs are grown in Redwood country. It is the same world wide. To stop poaching we need an ability for local businesses to thrive, as it is in the Gulf of California with the Vaquita Porpoise who is nearly extinct.