Humboldt Squid
by Ali Berman
Categories: Science.

The Humboldt squid usually isn’t seen by humans. Their preferred depth ranges anywhere from 660 to 2,300 feet under water. Sadly, over the past few days in Santa Cruz, California, hundreds of the deep sea creatures have been stranding themselves on the beach.

According to the LA Times, researches don’t know why the squid are essentially killing themselves in such large numbers. The animals usually don’t even live this far north, so there are multiple behaviors at work which don’t reflect the normal behaviors of the squid.

Stanford University researcher William Gilly said about the strandings, “My theory is that when the squid invade a new area … they follow an algorithm (which is to) swim and find productive areas, especially by investigating anomalies, until you run into trouble. That mission takes some of them onto the beach. The question I can’t answer is why they stop doing this after they successfully colonize an area.”

The Humboldt squid grows to approximately five feet in length and has been known to show aggression toward humans, mainly divers who might come into contact with them beneath the surface.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

About Ali Berman

Ali Berman is a writer, teacher and activist. She works as a humane educator for HEART teaching kids about issues affecting people, animals and the environment. Ali is also a fiction writer. Her published work can be found on her website at aliberman.com. In early 2012 Ali co-founded flipmeover, a production company with the mission to use media to raise awareness of social issues.

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