Shelter Dogs and Cats Become Colorado's Official State Pet
by Allyson Koerner
Categories: Animals, Causes.
Photo: Shelter animals get special Colorado honor

Shelter dogs and cats are getting a new honor in Colorado, as Gov. Hickenlooper recently made these wonderful animals the official state pet.

According to local Colorado news station KREX, Hickenlooper just signed the bill into law and officials hopes this will raise more awareness for rescues and demonstrate the importance of adopting animals.

One of the state’s county’s, Mesa County, which hosts the Mesa County Animal Services, has one of the highest adoption rates in the area. Penny McCarty, director of MCAS, said, “I think that the animal-human bond is very strong. I think that we respect that in our community.”

That definitely seems so, as this idea didn’t come from the governor, but was proposed by local children. The MCAS thinks this is wonderful; after all “these kids are future pet owners.”

Mesa County is a strong animal community, and according to McCarty, 2,226 animals were adopted just last year. Like rescuing, the finding of missing pets is just as important. “Our return to owner rate is 70 percent, which is more than double the national average. We have a good community of pet owners,” McCarty noted.

Of course, good news always seems to come with bad news. Some are opposing the bill and think this might open up an entirely new area for businesses transactions. Several opponents also feel that the shelter pets might not even be Colorado residents.

Who wouldn’t want rescues representing their state?

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

About Allyson Koerner

Allyson Koerner first found her love of writing while attending Westminster College in Pennsylvania, and that passion evolved while she was earning her Master's in Print & Multimedia Journalism at Boston's Emerson College. She's an experienced writer dabbling in all things vegan, green, entertainment and TV-related. Feel free to keep tabs on her over at Twitter: @AllysonKoerner.

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