bob harper vegan
by Michael dEstries
Categories: Healthy Living, Lifestyle
Tags: .

Update: An earlier version of this article reported that Bob Harper was a vegan. As pointed out in the comments, he no longer is – having found the addition of a small amount of animal products to work better overall for his current health.

“I found my performance was really lacking in the gym. I just felt better and I felt stronger,” he told the LA Times in June. “In the beginning, I was quietly eating my egg whites in the morning. Oh my God, I felt so bad. I just couldn’t help it. I just couldn’t hide it any more. It works for me. Of course, I am a huge proponent of eating as many green vegetables as you can and going meatless once in a while.”

The original article is below. We apologize for the confusion.

Bob Harper, one of the celebrity trainers on the hit reality series “The Biggest Loser” says that when it comes to weight loss,  a healthy diet will beat exercise every time.

“It is all about your diet,” Harper, 48, told Reuters.  “I used to think a long time ago that you can beat everything you eat out of you and it’s just absolutely not the case.”

Harper, who switched from a vegetarian diet to a vegan one back in 2010 (and earned a VegNews award in the process), is still quick to recommend daily exercise for complete and overall fitness.

“I’m working with people who are 500 pounds and doing Crossfit on a regular basis,” he says of the exercise routine that combines weightlifting, sprinting, and gymnastics. “Crossfit just completely makes sense [as long as] you work at your level doing the things you can do with proper coaching.”

As for veganism, Harper says its a diet that works for him and is yet another option for anyone looking to turn their health around.

“I enjoy living a plant-based diet because it makes me feel clear headed and strong, not to mention my genetically high cholesterol dropped more than 100 points,” he told VegNews. “That was all the motivation I needed.”

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

About Michael dEstries

Michael has been blogging since 2005 on issues such as sustainability, renewable energy, philanthropy, and healthy living. He regularly contributes to a slew of publications, as well as consulting with companies looking to make an impact using the web and social media. He lives in Ithaca, NY with his family on an apple farm.

View all posts by Michael dEstries →
  • Leslie Gray

    Being vegan may be fine for some people. BUT, it can be deadly for the wrong people. I have always been extremely active. I have hiked across most of the southern US, from Texas to California. I’ve even trekked all over England, Scotland and Ireland. I’m nearly 60 and I still walk and ride a bike almost every day.

    Yet, there was a time that I was trying to follow a vegan diet and experienced weight gain that my restrictive diet and exercise would not control. I found myself weighing in at over 300 pounds. I began to exhibit signs of becoming diabetic. I began to get dizzy a lot and sometimes pass out. I went to the ER several times with rapid pulse and high blood pressure. That’s when a doctor introduced me to the concept of dieting by blood type.

    Apparently, a vegan, wheat, corn and bean based diet was toxic for me. Seems there are 4 blood types for a reason. I matched my diet to my blood type and lost 100 pounds.

    By all means, pursue a healthy diet. But, don’t just jump on a diet and go for a ride. Do some independent research of your own. There far too many Adkins Diets out there. Just do a google search on “blood type diet” and do some reading. No everyone can be a vegan.

  • VeggieGal

    You might want to research your subjects a bit before writing articles about them — Bob Harper is no longer vegan and his new book in fact recommends people eat fish. Here’s him telling Reuters back in 2011 why he quit being vegan:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/16/us-biggestloser-idUSTRE78F2CV20110916

    Q: You recently stopped being a vegan. Why?

    A: “I still believe that a plant-based diet has tremendous health benefits but I have incorporated more animal protein into my diet. I found that my body personally got to a point where I needed something more. I used to yell at people who said that, but now all of a sudden, my body just kind of went, ‘I need something.’”