blackfish
by Michael dEstries
Categories: Animals, Causes.

With the captive whale documentary “Blackfish” still not widely available in theaters, we thought it might be a good idea to present some clips from the film for those wanting a better idea of the subject matter.

Not since “The Cove” have we seen an animal documentary make such an impact. From Pixar’s decision to re-write the ending of “Finding Dory” to school kids coming together in a touching PSA to denounce the practice of whales in captivity. “Blackfish” is having a measurable impact – and when it’s finally released on video in the U.S. (hopefully!) later this year, we expect awareness to soar.

And let’s not forget Oscar season. Fingers crossed there too.

For those living in the UK, you can download a copy of the movie now via iTunes. For more screening info around the world, hit the official site here.

Check out some clips from the film below.

Capturing the Orcas

The Arrival of Tilikum

Killer Whale Lands on Trainer

Official Trailer

About Michael dEstries

Michael has been blogging since 2005 on issues such as sustainability, renewable energy, philanthropy, and healthy living. He regularly contributes to a slew of publications, as well as consulting with companies looking to make an impact using the web and social media. He lives in Ithaca, NY with his family on an apple farm.

View all posts by Michael dEstries →
  • Sally Newell

    It is not right to imprison sentient beings who are self aware, talk with real words, who call each other by name, who remember family members names even after 20 years, who recognise themselves in the mirror, and who should be swimming 40-100km per day in the ocean and living long lives of 50-100 years, instead of dying at an average of 9 years in a tank that is barely longer than their bodies. We would not allow that for our own children – why should we allow it for the children of the People of the Sea.

    Please dont buy a ticket to a marine abusement park- they are Slave Worlds making obscenly large dollars from drugged and force fed captives, or from those born to mothers too young, and then taken away from them far too early. Please respect yourself and stay away.

    Orcas and dolphins are not “pets”. They are magnificent, large and strong and used to swimming very long distances in the ocean.

    At SeaWorld they are confined to tiny tanks that are barely longer than their bodies. Is a good way to care for animals?

    In the wild cetaceans breastfeed for around 4 years or so and stay with their families all their lives. At SeaWorld mothers and babies are routinely separated from 2 years to suit SeaWorlds inbreeding program.

    SeaWorld cites their “conservation efforts and research” but they spend much less than 1% of their gross on conservation, and paid part owners Blackstone 657 Million dollars in less than one year. The directors have been dumping stock and SEAS is on the nose, as the general public wakes up to the awful cruelty at SeaWorld. Where else to animals have to perform mindless tricks to even get fed except at a circus. This is not conservation, but exploitation.

    SeaWorld have never released an Orca back to the wild.

    SeaWorld pay for severed Beluga male organs, thus funding Beluga slaughter, for their inbreeding program.

    Going to SeaWorld is as educational about cetaceans as a visitor from Mars looking at humans in solitary confinement, or asking the Kings College Choir to sing Three Blind Mice.

    Cetacean cultures, languages and traditions have developed over 40 million years. It takes a matriarch (pod leader) decades of teaching to train her replacement, over the decades from 50′s to 80′s in age, at SeaWorld the average age of death is less than a decade. Some matriarchs live to over a 100 years in the wild. Cetaceans have more spindle cells, the neurons associated with empathy, than humans. They are self aware and are aware of their own mortality. They are the People of the Sea.