South American rainforest expedition discovers 60 new species
by Megan Thompson
Categories: Animals, Causes, Environment, Science.

A recent expedition in the rainforest wilderness of Suriname resulted in the discovery of a whopping 60 new species. The northern South American nation is home to some of the most remote and uncharted territory left on earth. Leeanne Alonso, an expedition leader with the Global Wildlife Conservation, said “I have conducted expeditions all over the world, but never have I seen such beautiful, pristine forests so untouched by humans.”

As sensitive frog populations have been suffering from fungus infections and polluted habitats around the world, the research team was particularly excited to find 6 new frog species in the Suriname forests.

Also discovered were 39 species of small mammals, including rodents, bats and opossums. Small animals such as these are directly linked to forest health as they eat and disperse seeds. The country of Suriname, due in part to these furry critters, has maintained an amazing 95% of its natural forests. The nation is part of the South American Guiana Shield wilderness, which contains 24% of the earth’s rainforest.

According to expedition leader Trond Larsen, the Suriname wilderness offers a valuable chance for learning and protection. He said “Suriname is one of the last places where an opportunity still exists to conserve massive tracts of untouched forest and pristine rivers where biodiversity is thriving.”

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

About Megan Thompson

Megan is a healthy living and natural beauty advocate who is obsessed with sustainable gardening, food politics, human rights and animal protection. An L.A. native, she loves staying on top of the latest pop culture news and green lifestyle trends. When she is not writing, she loves going to the beach, hula hooping and working on upcycling projects.

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