bacon lowers sperm quality
by Amanda Just
Categories: Eats, Healthy Living, Science.

It’s pretty much common knowledge by now that eating bacon isn’t good for your heart, but new research has found that it’s also detrimental to sperm.

Researchers from Harvard University gathered data from 156 men who were undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVR) with a partner. Each participant was asked about their diet, including how often they consumed fish, poultry, red meat, white meat, and processed meat. They found that, overall, men who consumed more than half a portion of processed meat (such as bacon) every day had significantly less “normal” sperm, compared with samples from men who ate less than half a portion of the same foods every day.

Author of the study, Dr. Myriam Afeiche, from the Harvard School of Public Health, said, “We found the effect of processed meat intake lowered [sperm] quality.” However, some health professionals aren’t convinced with Afeiche’s findings, saying that the study used too small of a sample.

Dr. Allan Pacey, chairman of the British Fertility Society, said, “The relationship between diet and men’s fertility is an interesting one, and there is certainly now convincing evidence that men who eat more fresh fruit and vegetables have better sperm than men who don’t. However, less is known about the fertility of men with poor diets and whether specific foods can be linked to poor sperm quality.”

Perhaps this study will lead to larger, more thorough investigations on the subject. Until then, bacon lovers, may I suggest some tempeh bacon?

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

About Amanda Just

Amanda Just is a longtime vegan who loves to promote compassionate living in fun, creative ways. As a writer, she has contributed to This Dish Is Veg, ForksOverKnives.com, and many other blogs, websites, and newsletters. As an activist, she champions many causes, from veganism and animal rights to environmental protection and human rights. Amanda resides in Tampa Bay, Florida.

View all posts by Amanda Just →