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Procter & Gamble Moves to Adopt 'No-Deforestation' Policy

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The Proctor & Gamble Co. have announced that in order to prevent further deforestation, they will stop using palm oil in their products. The world’s largest consumer products company made the decision after nearly 400,000 emails were sent to them from around the world. Dozens of protests were also held worldwide, including a high-profile event by Greenpeace at the company’s headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio.

“These numbers summarize well the tremendous effort placed by thousands of people around the world to demand Procter & Gamble (P&G) to break the link between their products and forest destruction, and the reasons why the company had to it,” said Greenpeace International.

P&G no deforestation policy promises to remove forest destruction from its palm oil supply chain by ensuring all their suppliers guarantee no conversion of peat lands, respect the rights of local communities and protect high carbon and high conservation value areas,” they added.

Proctor & Gamble says that the new policy will make all of its suppliers one hundred percent forest friendly by the year 2020. Although this sounds encouraging, at this very moment there are 7,300 orangutans, and as few as 400 Sumatran tigers left, which are at risk of being homeless. Both species are on the endangered list and could become extinct if deforestation continues. Six years is a long time to wait when whole species could be lost forever. “The few remaining Sumatran tigers in the world do not have another six years to wait as irresponsible companies drag their feet,” said Greenpeace International.

Greenpeace said that they “will be monitoring Procter & Gamble and its suppliers closely, and pushing for urgent action against suppliers such as Musim Mas and KLK who continue to be involved in clearing forests and peatlands. Because Greenpeace is independent and has offices around the world – including in Indonesia – this is something we are well equipped and ready to do.”

Procter & Gamble joins a group of other palm oil traders and consumers – Nestle, L’Oreal, Colgate-Palmolive, Unilever, Mars, Kellogg, Safeway, Delhaize, Ferrero, GAR and Wilmar – in their commitment to ending deforestation.

Although saving the habitat of wild animals is highly commendable, it would also be wonderful if they saved the animal themselves by no longer using them for product testing. Hopefully, this is next on their agenda.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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