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Diet Doc simultaneously tries to sell a vegan diet and warns it’s severe

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Even though veganism is not a diet, we find ourselves constantly battling the misconceptions around how to successfully maintain health as a vegan.

So when Market Wired pop-up in our feed with the promise that Diet Doc could get us “rapid weight loss through doctor supervision of popular ‘Vegan Diet’ plan,” we had to read on. In the pitch, the 78 million obese Americans they target are told that cutting out animal products is going to rid them of those excess pounds, and can cure their food addictions. But it’s too good to be true, because it suddenly takes a sharp turn at the corner of “health considerations” and “dietary imbalances.”

They teach readers that vegans “need to maintain specific diet schedules and exercise plans in order to avoid excessive hunger, dietary imbalance or fatigue” and that “being on a Vegan Diet can result in many benefits but without proper care, the drawbacks can be severe as well.” Protein supplementation, unhealthy vegan options, and medical history (as if some people can’t eat plants) are called to light, while still somehow trying to make people believe Diet Doc is the only source that knows how to make it work. The final clue that they seriously don’t get it, is their choice to source Health magazine as an authority on the topic.

When doctors hijack the popularity of veganism to try to sell weightless programs, nothing good comes of it. The scares tactics employed to make people fear removing animal products from their plates always focuses on what people stand to lose, and not what animals have to gain. We get it, promoting that plant-based eating can be done by anyone, easily, would halt Diet Doc sales. It’s just a scary thought that people could try “veganism” this way, and abandon it when the unrealistic promises it makes them fails.

You’ve got the power to go vegan today, and there’s more riding on it then your waistline.

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0 Comments
  • AllVegan

    This “press release” came across my desk as well, It is so frustrating that these boogeyman scare tactics about potential deficiencies are consistently used to discourage people from adopting a healthy diet. We will probably never know what marketing genius came up with the B12 deficiency, therefore you need meat connection. Everyone seems to know two things about nutrition, that bananas are a good source of potassium and that you need to eat meat to get B12. neither of these things as it turns out are true. According to the Framingham Offspring Study the majority of meat eaters are at suboptimal levels or deficient in B12, beyond that the researchers found no correlation between the amount of meat eaten and B12 levels, suggesting that B12 is not bioavailable in any significant amount from meat . Beyond that meat has very little B12 in it, if you look at the amount of B12 in beef it would take about 18 ounces of meat a day to get to the RDA for B12 and that is assuming that the B12 is 100% absorbable which of course it is not. The fact is that B12 is abundant in nature and our ancestors got all they needed by drinking from groundwater sources and eating food without washing it. It is modern sanitation which has removed it from our diet, not a meat deficiency. It is too bad that we live in a time when maintaining market share is more important than anything else, even the truth, no matter how many people it hurts.

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